Friday, March 22, 2013

The Ides of March




The Ides of March

How often have you heard someone say: “beware the Ides of March”?  And how often have you wondered what that really means?
Sure, we all know it was the date that Brutus assassinated Julius Caesar, but who cares?  That was in 44 BC, so why are we still worried?  How come nobody reminds us to beware of so many other dates when people have been assassinated - is it because the date is less important than the concept of someone betraying us? 
How often have you been betrayed or disappointed by friends and loved ones, and how many times have your hopes and aspirations been dashed by those you’ve trusted? Life is full of these kinds of ups and downs, but we shouldn’t spend our days fearful of those around us. Rather than worrying, maybe we should work hard to make sure we’re the kind of person that others could and should trust, the kind that others never consider betraying or disappointing.  We should communicate effectively with others so that the chance mistakes that lead to mistrust and betrayal don’t happen.  And maybe we shouldn’t be so fixated on being afraid – most things turn out okay if we let them.
I feel badly that Brutus betrayed and killed Caesar….but I can’t let that long ago event ruin my day.  No more than I should fear getting in a car or walking across the street – how many of those routine acts have resulted in more fatal incidents than we can count or keep track of.  Life is certainly full of risks – but if we’re open and honest and aware and careful, chances are we’ll get through the day without anything more than the normal scratches that life presents.  So keep your eyes, ears and minds open today for all that’s going on around you, and Enjoy the Ides of March!
My message this week is about being honest and fair:
“I never think about my best interests. I think about what's the right thing to do in a situation.” Clive Palmer
Most of the time we’re encouraged to be consistent, the thinking being that doing the same for everyone is the right thing to do.  But how often are circumstances exactly the same – almost never, and so consistency is not always the right way to proceed.  Having to think about what’s the right thing to do in a situation is a better way to approach things: you have to assess everything, use all your expertise and experience, add some common sense, and then decide on the best course of action.  That way others will know that you considered all the factors and options, and decided on what’s fair and just.  Deciding the right thing to do is the way to be fair, and that’s what others expect and deserve. That’s all you can ask of others….and them of you.
Stay well!

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